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Reverse Bankart lesion Radiology

POLPSA Lesion - RadsourceTrough fracture and reverse Bankart lesion | Image

Reverse Bankart lesion Radiology Case Radiopaedia

This is uncommon case of the reverse Bankart lesion with subacromial impingement, arthritis in the AC joint. 1 article features images from this case Reverse Bankart lesion Axial non-contrast Compression defect in the anteromedial humeral head (reverse Hill-Sachs lesion) and small chip fracture of the posterior glenoid (reverse Bankart lesion) are the sequelae of prior posterior shoulder dislocation

Strictly speaking, a Bankart lesion refers to an injury of the labrum and associated glenohumeral capsule/ligaments (see History and etymology below). Injury to these reinforcing soft tissue structures is thought to predispose to recurrent dislocation 7 Bankart lesions are typically located in the 3-6 o'clock position because that's where the humeral head dislocates. There are many labral variants that may simulate a labral tear. They also have a typical location. They are not in the 3-6 o'clock position, which makes it easy to differentiate them from a Bankart tear A type X lesion is either a tear of the superior labrum with extension into the rotator cuff interval, resulting in an injury to the superior glenohumeral ligament, coracohumeral ligament, capsule, or synovium (Figs 21, E3), or it is a SLAP lesion associated with a reverse Bankart lesion . Figure 21a. SLAP type X lesion (into the rotator interva In the reverse Bankart lesion, the posteroinferior labrum is detached from its glenoid attachment and there is an avulsive tear of the posterior scapular periosteum (Figs. 6A and 6B) Reverse Hill-Sachs lesion, also called a McLaughlin lesion, is defined as an impaction fracture of anteromedial aspect of the humeral head following posterior dislocation of the humerus. It is of surgical importance to identify this lesion and correct it to prevent avascular necrosis

Posterior shoulder dislocation with reverse Hill-Sachs and

Posterior instability lesions include the reverse Bankart (Figure 5a), the posterior labrum periosteal sleeve avulsion injury (POLPSA) (Figure 6a), and the posterior band inferior glenohumeral ligament avulsion from the humerus (PHAGL) (Figure 7a). 7,8. The MRI findings in these patients often provide useful indicators of clinical significance Bankart lesions are the most common labral injury associated with traumatic instability, classically manifesting as avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament and labral complex from the glenoid rim, with complete scapular periosteal disruption A reverse Bankart lesion can occurs in case of a posterior dislocation Youtube 자료를 PDF노트로 만들었습니다.https://youtu.be/XEDl-iAdzuQ여기에 제가 사용법을 동영상으로 올려두었습니다.https://gumroad.com. A variation of the Bankart lesion, the Perthes lesion occurs when the scapular periosteum remains intact but is stripped medially [1, 2], and the anterior labrum is avulsed from the glenoid but remains partially attached to the scapula by the intact periosteum.(Fig. 1A, 1B) The labrum may assume a normal position, but in these cases, the stabilizing function may be lost and thus the shoulder.

The POLPSA lesion is an abnormality that can be associated with posterior instability. It differs from a reverse Bankart lesion because the periosteum, although detached, remains intact with the posterior capsule and detached posterior labrum. This lesion may represent an acute form of a Bennett les A reverse Hill-Sachs lesion is a compression fracture of the anteromedial aspect of the humeral head secondary to impaction on the posterior glenoid rim during a posterior shoulder dislocation rather than the more common anterior dislocation (figure 6-8).20 Posterior dislocations are largely produced by trauma, with most of the remainder caused by seizures The purpose of this article is to review mechanisms of injury leading to posterior glenohumeral instability and the correlated imaging findings on CT and MRI. CONCLUSION. In patients with suspected posterior glenohumeral instability, imaging of the affected shoulder can show abnormalities of the bone, labrum, and joint capsule The Bankart lesion is less common and can be challenging to visualize on radiography, particularly when small. which also profiles the trough and reverse Bankart fractures better ( Fig. 4). Fig. 4. lesion itself is asymptomatic but is commonly associated with posterior labral and posterior undersurface rotator cuff tear. Advanced Imaging

Radiology Checklists. Why these are important? · Hill Sachs lesion. · Bankart lesion. · SLAP tear · Fracture Humerus · Fracture Acromion · Fracture Clavicle · HAGL · Reverse Bankart and Reverse Hill Sachs · Muscle Denervation. (a, b) AP and axial views X-rays of a left shoulder showing a reverse bony Bankart lesion with 2 mm of displacement (red arrows). (c - f) Axial T2 images with fat saturation showing a posterior glenoid fracture (red arrow) with an articular cartilage defect (pink arrow) and a chronic appearing tear of the posterior and posteroinferior labrum with avulsion of the posterior scapular periosteum (orange arrow) and a patulous posterior capsule (yellow arrow) A reverse osseous Bankart lesion refers to an impaction fracture of the posterior glenoid resulting from posterior dislocation of the humerus (Fig. 5.60). The reverse Bankart is usually seen after trauma but occasionally with atraumatic posterior or multidirectional instability (107)

Computed tomography is also useful in defining the size and orientation of a reverse Hill-Sachs lesion, a reverse Bankart lesion, posterior glenoid bone loss, or bony Bankart lesion (Figure 7). MRI is much more useful in evaluating soft tissue pathology (Figure 8) Associated injuries are common with 58% having a labral tear, 32% a SLAP lesion, 26% a reverse Bankart lesion, 21% a chondral injury, 21% rotator cuff injury, and 11% extension of the tear into the posterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament. Discussion: Disruption of the posterior capsule is a rare cause of recurrent posterior. Bankart lesion. SLAP tear Reverse Bankart and Reverse Hill Sachs; School of Radiology Boston MSK MRI Review. 194 Lessons £399.00. EXCELLENCE PROGRAM, School of Radiology Bone and Joint Imaging: Case Review Series . 125 Lessons £399.00. Free Resources; All Courses; Disclaimer; PRIVACY POLICY. Results: In 31 (86%) of the 36 patients, a reverse Hill-Sachs lesion was found. Eleven (31%) patients had a reverse osseous Bankart lesion. Twelve full-thickness rotator cuff tears were seen in seven (19%) patients: four supraspinatus tendon, three infraspinatus tendon, and five subscapularis tendon tears Posterior shoulder dislocations are rare compared to anterior shoulder dislocations and occur most commonly from an axial load while the arm is internally rotated and in the adducted position. Initial imaging includes plain radiographs: AP view & axillary view. Complications include: Reverse Bankart lesion, Reverse Hill-Sachs lesion, fractures.

Posterior shoulder dislocation with reverse Hill-Sachs and

develop Bankhart and Hill-Sachs lesions [3, 4]. The classic Bankart lesion is an anterior labral tear/detachment which extends through periosteum, and may involve the bony glenoid or just the labrum. The classic Hill-Sachs lesion is an impaction injury of the posterolateral humeral head, caused by contact of the Imagin Tearing of the anteroinferior glenoid labrum (Bankart lesion) and of the posteroinferior glenoid labrum (reverse Bankart lesion) are well-documented, common injuries fol-lowing traumatic shoulder subluxation or dislocation. The labral injury, as well as the loss of tension of the attached capsuloligamentous structures, is known to lead to recurren The corresponding fracture of the posterior glenoid (when present) is called a reverse Bankart lesion. Reducing a posterior shoulder dislocation is generally more difficult than reducing an anterior dislocation; if available, orthopedic consultation is indicated prior to reduction, as is adequate sedation, analgesia, and muscle relaxation ( Fig. Bankart lesions are named after English Orthopedic Surgeon Arthur Sydney Blundell Bankart, 1879-1951, who first described the injury and the surgical repair process. Here we will look at the common causes, associated injuries, symptoms and treatment options, both surgical and non surgical, for a Bankart lesion labrum tear

Reverse Hill-Sachs and reverse Bankart lesion in a case of posterior instability. T1-weighted TSE axial magnetic resonance image reveals hemarthrosis, posterior glenohumeral dislocation and reverse Hill-Sachs lesion (straight arrow). There is associated posterior labral tear (reverse Bankart lesion), shown with a dashed arrow Reverse Hill-Sachs and Bankart lesions may be seen on axial radiographs, CT scans or MRI of the shoulder. Reverse Hill-Sachs and Reverse Bony Bankart Lesions. Posterior dislocation of the shoulder results in reverse Hill-Sachs and Bankart lesions. The reverse Hill-Sachs lesion is also known as the trough sign Results: In 31 (86%) of the 36 patients, a reverse Hill-Sachs lesion was found. Eleven (31%) patients had a reverse osseous Bankart lesion. Eleven (31%) patients had a reverse osseous Bankart lesion. Twelve full-thickness rotator cuff tears were seen in seven (19%) patients: four supraspinatus tendon, three infraspinatus tendon, and five. A reverse Hill-Sachs lesion of the anterior humeral head or a reverse Bankart lesion of the posterior glenoid may accompany posterior glenohumeral dislocation. A reverse Hill-Sachs lesion may be suspected when a vertical line is identified parallel to the glenoid at radiography (trough sign) ( Fig 14 ) ( 40 )

Bankart lesion Radiology Reference Article Radiopaedia

Furthermore, the presence of a reverse Bankart lesion, seen in 5 of the 19 patients (26%), may have diverted the attention of the reporting radiologist away from the concurrent capsular tearing. To further improve the sensitivity of this investigation, we suggest that the MRI should be performed using intra-articular gadolinium with the arm. These lesions are associated with anterior instability, whereas the reverse Hill-Sachs (trough) and reverse Bankart lesions result from posterior dislocation (Figs. 3A, 3B, 3C). The potential findings on MR imaging of the patient with shoulder dysfunction cover a wide range of labral abnormalities, including a torn, avulsed, crushed, or frayed. sular complex include glenoid labrum tear, paraglenoid labral cyst, reverse glenohumer-al ligament avulsion, reverse Bankart lesion, periosteal sleeve avulsion, Kim's lesion, and posterior rotator cuff tendon tear. In the reverse Bankart lesion, the postero - inferior labrum is detached from its glenoi Posterior instability of the shoulder is best imaged using a combination of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) examinations. Glenoid hypoplasia may play a role in posterior instability and is best evaluated with CT imaging. Posterior labral lesions, to include reverse Bankart lesions, Kim lesions, and POLPSA lesions, are best.

Posteroir Labral Tear (Reverse Bankart tear) 5. Subscapularis: Blasier et al identified the subscapularis as being the muscle providing the greatest resistance to posterior subluxation of the humerus (Blasier RB, Soslowsky LJ, Malicky DM, et al: Posterior glenohumeral subluxation: Active and passive stabilization in a biomechanical model Preoperative radiographs and/or magnetic resonance imaging revealed posterior rim calcification or reverse Bankart lesions in 29 cases (94%). At arthroscopy, posterior labral injuries, reverse Bankart lesions, or humeral head defects were identified. Follow-up averaged 40 months, and the mean duration between injury and surgery was 21 months Hill Sachs lesions are only seen at the level of the coracoid. Anteriorly we are now at the 3-6 o'clock position. This is where the Bankart lesion and variants are seen. Notice the fibers of the inferior GHL. At this level also look for Bankart lesions Radiographs are frequently normal; however, this combination of views is necessary to accurately assess the athlete's shoulder for bony pathology including reverse Hill-Sachs lesions (Fig. 20.5), reverse bony Bankart avulsions (Fig. 20.6), glenoid rim abnormalities, glenoid dysplasia, or lesser tuberosity fractures that are often considered. Figure 18 Reverse Hill-Sachs and reverse Bankart lesion in a case of posterior instability. T1-weighted TSE axial magnetic resonance image reveals hemarthrosis, posterior glenohumeral dislocation and reverse Hill-Sachs lesion (straight arrow). There is associated posterior labral tear (reverse Bankart lesion), shown with a dashed arrow

Reverse Bankart lesion, with GLAD. Axial T1-weighted fat-saturated MR arthrogram image shows a fracture of the posterior glenoid with an articular cartilage lesion ( arrow ) A SLAP II lesion must be distinguished from a normal sublabral recess. Patterns of injury seen in posterior instability are the reverse of those found following anterior dislocation with posterior labral tears referred to as a reverse Bankart lesion

The Radiology Assistant : Shoulder instability - MR

  1. Tearing of the anteroinferior glenoid labrum (Bankart lesion) and of the posteroinferior glenoid labrum (reverse Bankart lesion) the humerus are much less common but have recently gained attention due to advancements in arthroscopic experience and imaging techniques. In 1942, Nicola first described an acute shoulder dislocation with.
  2. Tearing of the anteroinferior glenoid labrum (Bankart lesion) and of the posteroinferior glenoid labrum (reverse Bankart lesion) are well-documented, common injuries following traumatic shoulder subluxation or dislocation. The labral injury, as well as the loss of tension of the attached capsuloligamentous structures, is known to lead to recurrent instability. Injuries t
  3. The reverse Bankart lesion is similar to the classic Bankart lesion but at the posterior labrum (Figure 18). The posterior labrocapsular periosteal sleeve avulsion (POLPSA), reverse Perthes, and the reverse GLAD lesion correspond to the ALPSA and GLAD lesion, respectively, but at the posterior labrum (Figure 18)

Start studying Radiology- Upper Extremities. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. True Bankart lesion on MRI - Fx line thru the bony glenoid (pic shows chronic event) Reverse bankart (Xray not true AP view - very hard to see.. get a CT as it will show you better. Glenoid Fx He was investigated further with cross-sectional imaging and MR revealed a glenohumeral hemarthrosis, and reverse Hill Sach's lesion with a reverse Bankart's lesion. The rotator cuff was intact. There was a displaced fracture of acromion with marked osseous and soft tissue oedema (Figures 2 & 3)

A reverse Bankart lesion would refer to a posterior to inferior tear of the labrum. The superior portion of the labrum can also be torn indicating a SLAP tear. Labral tears can be treated with an arthroscopic repair that involves securing the labrum back to the glenoid and tightening the joint capsule if necessary Careful history and physical examination are critical in the diagnosis of HAGL lesions. MRI is the best imaging study for diagnosing these lesions. 32% a SLAP lesion, 26% a reverse Bankart.

Objective: This study aimed to present middle-term functional and radiological outcomes of the transfer of the lesser tuberosity in the management of reverse Hill-Sachs lesions following posterior dislocations of the shoulder. Patients and methods: With a diagnosis of neglected posterior shoulder dislocation (8 locked, 5 recurrent), 13 male patients (age range: 28-72; mean age: 39.3 years) who.

The Radiology Assistant : Shoulder MR - Instability

Imaging the Glenoid Labrum and Labral Tears RadioGraphic

A great way to deal with this problem is use of checklists. It is a systematic and pragmatic way of ensuring that all areas are reviewed and analysed. All abnormalities are reported. We are glad to share a list of commonly used checklists in MSK MRI. We would love if you can add on to the list.. 4. Tyler TF, Nicholas SJ, Seneviratne AM. (2006). The bankart lesion. In RC Manske (Ed.), Postsurgical orthopedic sports rehabilitation knee and shoulder (pp. 563-581). Missouri: Mosby Elsevier. 5. Moseley JB, Jobe FW, Pink M, Perry J, Tibone J. EMG analysis of the scapular muscles during a shoulder rehabilitation program Reverse Hill-sachs lesion consists of an anteromedial superior humeral head impaction fracture that is often associated with a reverse Bankart lesion (posterior labrum glenoid disruption) (22). In.

(A-B): Reverse Hill-Sachs and reverse Bankart lesion in a 34-year-old male who had multidirectional instability with a posterior dislocation at presentation. Axial TSE T1W fat-saturated MRA images (A,B) show a reverse Hill- Sachs lesion (long arrow) as a bony defect in the anterior humeral head Reverse Hill-Sachs and reverse Bankart lesion in a 34-year-old male who had multidirectional instability with a posterior dislocation at presentation. Axial TSE T1W fat-saturated MRA images (A,B) show a reverse Hill-Sachs lesion (long arrow) as a bony.. A Bankart lesion is an injury of the anterior glenoid labrum of the shoulder due to anterior shoulder dislocation. When this happens, a pocket at the front of the glenoid forms that allows the humeral head to dislocate into it. It is an indication for surgery and often accompanied by a Hill-Sachs lesion, damage to the posterior humeral head.. The Bankart lesion is named after English. This type of injury is referred to as a Bankart lesion. A tear involving only the back portion of the labrum is called a reverse Bankart lesion. A SLAP lesion ( S uperior L abrum A nterior to P osterior) refers to a tear in the labrum that runs across the top of the labrum from front to back

Consider CT if high suspicion for posterior dislocation with equivocal x-rays or to characterize size of reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. Complications: 3, 4. Reverse Bankart lesion - tear of posterolateral labrum; Reverse Hill-Sachs deformity - impaction fracture of anteromedial aspect of humeral head; Fracture of humeral shaft; Fracture of. Bankart Lesion. A Bankart lesion is defined as an anterior labral disruption with tearing of the attached periosteum, usually as a result of anterior dislocation. From: The Athlete's Shoulder (Second Edition), 2009. Download as PDF Tears can occur in all regions of the labrum. The most studied injury to the labrum is the superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) tear. Anterior dislocations of the shoulder can be associated with a disruption of the anteroinferior labrum and anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament, also known as a Bankart lesion

Anterior-inferior labral lesions of recurrent shoulder dislocation evaluated by MR arthrography in an adduction internal rotation (ADIR) position. Song HT, Huh YM, Kim S, Lee SA, Kim SJ, Shin KH, Suh JS. J Magn Reson Imaging, 23(1):29-35, 01 Jan 2006 Cited by: 16 articles | PMID: 1631521 Nonetheless, advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy continue to improve our awareness and understanding of this clinical entity. 9. Bony defects following posterior shoulder instability include the reverse Hill-Sachs lesion, the reverse bony Bankart lesion, and attritional posterior bone loss

Reverse Bankart lesions occur when the posterior portion of the glenoid labrum is avulsed during a posterior shoulder dislocation. When this lesion is present, administered contrast can be seen entering into the posterior glenoid fossa, beyond the labrum Normal anatomical variants include: - sublabral foramen - sublabral recess - buford complex - capsular insertionsShoulder instability includes: - anterior glenohumeral instability: (a) anteroinferi.. Assessment of coincidence and defect sizes in Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions after anterior shoulder dislocation: a radiological study. The British journal of radiology 2014;87(1034):20130673. ↑ 14.0 14.1 Widjaja AB, Tran A, Bailey M, Proper S. Correlation between Bankart and Hill‐Sachs lesions in anterior shoulder dislocation

Video: Imaging Signs of Posterior Glenohumeral Instability

Treatment may be nonoperative or operative depending on chronicity of symptoms, recurrence of instability, and the severity of labrum and/or glenoid defects. Epidemiology. Incidence. 2% to 5% of all unstable shoulders. 50% of traumatic posterior dislocations seen in the emergency department are undiagnosed. Risk factors These lesions have uniformly good outcomes with surgical treatment, and restoration of labral height is a key component in prevention of recurrent instability. 7,42,43 Depending on the force vector of the trauma and the displacement of the labral tear, a bony avulsion from the glenoid, commonly known as a reverse bony Bankart lesion, may occur Lesions of the posterior labrum may be classified using the classification by Kim et al. Posterior labral lesions, to include reverse Bankart lesions, Kim lesions, and POLPSA lesions, are best.

Reverse Hill-Sachs lesion Radiology Reference Article

At arthroscopy, posterior labral injuries, reverse Bankart lesions, or humeral head defects were identified. Follow-up averaged 40 months, and the mean duration between injury and surgery was 21. A reverse Bankart lesion is often seen in patients with a history of traumatic posterior dislocation. Assessment of the degree of bony disruption helps preoperative planning. Though bony defects can be seen on MRA, CT has a high sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 78%, respectively [ 49 ] Bankart lesion or the indications, risk factors, tech-niques, or outcomes of arthroscopic or open Bankart posterior/reverse Bankart were excluded. For any dis-crepancies among reviewers' decisions, full manuscripts surgical technique (n ¼ 11), imaging (n ¼ 4), and anatomy/biomechanics (n ¼ 3) (Fig 3). The majority o labrum (reverse Bankart). MRI (for best results done with MR arthrogram) is performed not only to confirm the diagnosis of a Bankart lesion, but to diagnose a concomitant rotator cuff tear (as in the above case). Physical therapy can be tried to avoid repeated dislocations, but surgical repair may be necessary. Ray Hashemi, M

(A) Reverse Hill Sachs lesion. Due to an impaction between the anteromedial humeral head and posterior glenoid rim. Results in cortical depression of the anteromedial aspect of the humeral head. (B) Reverse bony Bankart lesion. Detachment of posteroinferior labrum with avulsion of posterior scapular periosteum and posterior glenoid rim fracture Similar to Bankart lesions in anterior shoulder dislocation, reverse Bankart lesions occur in posterior shoulder dislocation when the posterior portion of the glenoid labrum is avulsed. Reverse Bankart lesions can be diagnosed by visualizing the contrast's entry into the posterior glenoid fossa, beyond the glenoid labrum In the recurrent dislocation group, 68 Bankart lesions, 11 free ALPSA lesions, 13 bony Bankart lesions, 16 adhesive ALPSA lesions, and 1 glenoid articular rim disruption lesion were found

Posterior IGHL lesions can be seen with posterior shoulder dislocation . Lesions that may be associated include a reverse Bankart lesion, reverse Hill-Sachs lesion, and posterior labral tears . The humeral avulsion of the glenoid ligament lesion also represents an injury of the IGHL UCL injuries and SLAP tear in high school and junior high school than in the control group. Han KJ, Kim JK, Lim SK, Park JY, Oh KS. The effect of physical characteristics and field position on the shoulder and elbow injuries of 490 baseball players: confirmation of diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging. Clin J Sport Med 2009;19:271-276 Radiology Upper Extremities study guide by bryanbeckytang includes 142 questions covering vocabulary, terms and more. True Bankart lesion on MRI - Fx line thru the bony glenoid (pic shows chronic event) Reverse bankart (Xray not true AP view - very hard to see.. get a CT as it will show you better. Glenoid Fx

The posterior instability counterpart to this lesion is a reverse soft tissue Bankart affecting the posteroinferior margin of the glenoid (95, 96). Contrast or joint fluid is seen between the detached labroligamentous complex and the glenoid, allowing the diagnosis by MR in 80% of the cases ( 93 ) Abstract. Magnetic resonance arthrography is superior to other imaging techniques in evaluation of the glenohumeral joint. Normal variants that can be diagnostic pitfalls include the anterosuperior sublabral foramen, the Buford complex, and hyaline cartilage under the labrum. Anteroinferior dislocation is the most frequent cause of anterior. These include injuries to the anterior or anteroinferior glenoid rim (called bony Bankart lesions), or to the labro-capsulo-ligamentous soft tissue stabilizers of the shoulder (called soft tissue Bankart lesions) . Bony Bankart lesions are the only ones visible on conventional radiography. They will show as blunting, or as a fracture of the. Tearing of the anteroinferior glenoid labrum (Bankart lesion) and of the posteroinferior glenoid labrum (reverse Bankart lesion) are well-documented, common injuries following traumatic shoulder subluxation or dislocation. The labral injury, as well as the loss of tension of the attached capsuloligamentous structures, is known to lead to recurrent instability Posterior Labral Tear. A posterior labral tear is referred to as a reverse Bankart lesion, or attenuation of the posterior capsulolabral complex, and commonly occurs due to repetitive microtrauma in athletes. Diagnosis can be made clinically with positive posterior labral provocative tests and confirmed with MRI studies of the shoulder

POLPSA Lesion - Radsourc

Beyond the Cuff: MR Imaging of Labroligamentous Injuries

Soft tissue Bankart lesion. Reverse soft tissue Bankart lesion. ICD-9 Codes. SLAP. 840.7 Lesion superior glenoid labrum. 840.8 Tear superior glenoid labrum. Bankart. 718.20 Pathological dislocation. 718.31 Subluxation shoulder anterior recurrent, subluxation shoulder posterior recurrent. 905.6 Late effect of dislocatio Bankart lesion Bankart lesions are labral tears without an os-seus fragment. MR arthrography or arthroscopy are optimal to diagnose Bankart or Bankart-like lesions. There is a detachment of the anteroinferior labrum (3-6 o'clock) with complete tearing of the anterior scapular periosteum. The arrow points to the disrupted periosteum lesion more conspicuous.4 When this occurs in the posterior labrum, it is called a reverse Perthes lesion (Figure 5). In a patient with anterior glenohumeral instability without a Bankart lesion, pathology of the anterior band of the infe-rior glenohumeral ligament (IGHL) at its humeral attachment must be suspected Shoulder Imaging. Allows classification of acromion (Type I-flat, Type II-curved, Type III-hooked). Hooked acromion is associated with impingement and rotator cuff pathology. Help visualize the AC joint. Shows AC joint disease and distal clavicle osteolysis. dilute gadolinium-containing solution is percutaneously injected into the joint -Classic Bankart lesion -Bony Bankart lesion -Isolated capsular tear Anterior Instability •Failure in continuity: -IGHL stretches or attenuates Robin Smithuis and Henk Jan van der Woude Radiology department of the Rijnland hospital, Leiderdorp and the Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Anterior Instabilit

Bankart lesion - Physiopedi

Radiology. 2005;237:578-583. Wischer TK, Bredella MA, Genant HK, et al.Perthes lesion (a variant of the Bankart lesion): MR imaging and MR arthrographic findings with surgical correlation.AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2002;178:233-237. Neviaser TJ. The anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion lesion: A cause of anterior instability of the. A reverse Bankart lesion may occur after a posterior dislocation as the result of excessive stress on the glenohumeral joint with the arm in adduction and internal rotation. A reverse Bankart lesion consists of a detachment of the posteroinferior labrum, which may or may not be associated with a fracture of the posterior glenoid

[Posterior shoulder instability_01] Reverse Bankart lesion

Management of a posterior shoulder dislocation with an associated reverse Hill-Sachs lesion is challenging, both diagnostically and therapeutically. Diagnosis is frequently delayed or missed, whereas the resulting humeral head defect is often larger and more difficult to salvage than in anterior shoulder dislocations. This report presents the case of a 29-year-old male with a recurrent. The Bankart lesion must be thoroughly elevated from the glenoid neck such that the subscapularis is clearly visible through the defect (Figure 8). This step is critical to the sucess of the procedure The soft tissue lesion may be avulsed patients.32,33 along with a piece of bone, the bony Bankart lesion, along the anteroinferior aspect of the Anterior Instability glenoid rim.42 The axial imaging plane is the primary plane for Clinical features detecting a Bankart lesion and MR imaging may Recurrent subluxation or dislocation (shoulder.

Perthes Lesion (A Variant of the Bankart Lesion

In 1923, Dr. Arthur Bankart first developed a surgical technique to treat recurrent anterior shoulder instability.1 Over the years, repair of the Bankart lesion has evolved with the concurrent progression of medical technologies. Although the modern technique differs from the original, today's surgeons still incorporate Bankart's original philosophy, which consists of an open repair with a. En ortopedia, la lesión de Bankart es una rotura de la parte anteroinferior del reborde glenoideo o labrum glenoideo de la escápula, a consecuencia de una luxación anterior de hombro. Perthes lesion is variant of Bankart lesion, presenting as an anterior glenohumeral injury that occurs when the scapular periosteum remains intact but is stripped

The POLPSA lesion: MR imaging findings with arthroscopic

Preoperative imaging includes CT 3-D reconstruction (a), axial CT (b), sagittal CT (c), and T2 axial MRI (d) and it depicts a posterior Bankart lesion and bony fragment. Figure 2 Arthroscopic Reverse Bony Bankart Repair for Posterior Glenohumeral Instability. By James P Bradley 12 Videos. October 15, 2010 Arthroscopic Bankart & Remplissage Procedure 15:47. RHAGL Lesion and Large Engaging Hill-Sac Feat. S. Snyder 08:50. Peter Millett. Bony Bankart Bridge Technique. Ultrasound (US) is a reliable non-invasive method to image the rotator cuff tendons. Even though glenoid labral pathology is common, it is not routinely looked at as part of the shoulder ultrasound protocol. Currently, the gold standard for labral imaging remains MR arthrography. However, given the rather long waiting list and cost implications, US may be used as a modality to quickly screen.

Spectrum of Findings Radiology Ke

A Hill-Sachs lesion, or Hill-Sachs impaction fracture, is an injury to the back portion of the rounded top of your upper arm bone (humerus). This injury occurs when you dislocate your shoulder. It. In this case, the most commonly described abnormalities were a posterior labrum lesion in 204 shoulders, 32-35, 38, 42-44 a reverse Hill-Sachs lesion in 43 shoulders, 32, 34, 35, 40, 42, 44 a glenoid posterior rim fracture or rim calcification in 30 shoulders, 38 a stretching of the posterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament in 22. SLAP lesion increases the strain on the anterior band of the IGHL and thus compromises stability of shoulder. Associated conditions. internal impingement. GIRD. rotator cuff tears (usually articular sided) instability (may be subtle) scapular dyskinesis. Anatomy. Anatomy of glenohumeral joint Bankart lesion Radiology Case Radiopaedia . Shoulder instability: the shoulder is the commonest joint dislocated Posterior labral tears and reverse Bankart lesions will demonstrate similar findings as their anterior counterparts, except they occur at the posterior glenoid rim Anterior inferior glenolabral injuries occur secondary to. The usual damage is either to the shoulder ligaments, called a Bankart tear, which occurs in younger people, or to the rotator cuff tendons, which usually occur in older people. In addition to ligament or tendon damage, the bone and cartilage can also be damaged; the most common type of damage from a shoulder dislocation is a Hill-Sachs defect

Radiographic/MR Imaging Correlation of the - Radiology Ke

Shoulder MRI - RADICON INSTITUTE OF RADIOLOG